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in which science and scientists played a central and vital role. the manhattan project, the thousands of physicists and other scientists who developed the atomic bomb was the most dramatic illustration of this, i think probably today almost as well known were the thousands of mathematicians and other sign b terrific work withers in england and washington, d.c. who broke the german e anything ma, cipher and other access codes. the very small group of parish parish -- british and american scientists who really turned the tide in the battle against the u-boats are not so nearly well known at all. but their contribution was, i think, every bit as vital not only in winning one of the most crucial battles in the war against nazi germany, but also for its lasting consequences in revolutionizing the very way military commanders think about war. for that matter, revolution eyeing the way quantitative an access could be apply today a host of practical problems in the business world through the new science patrick plaqueet and his -- blacket and his scientists created during the war, operational
in forecast, what physics meteorologist and the natural sciences can teach us about economics, physicist explain the ebb and flow of market of economy can relate to science. look for the title in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near too future on booktv and booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's a look at the prime time lineup for tonight. .. now author sara carr explores the results of the state legislature's decision shortly after hurricane katrina to re-assign control over the majority of new orleans public schools to the recovery school district, administered by the state. by following a student, teacher, and a principal as they traverse different segments of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during th
in computer science. he said, come look at my computer lab, i went to his computer lab and he had the big machine and it looked impressive to me. i had a mac at home. he said let me show you something, it's the first time i saw the worldwide web. it showed exhibit and had picture and text. as far as i knew the internet was text. i said, james, if you can have text on the computer why can't we have a newspaper on the web? i said that and he said, well, maybe we should something like that? one thing lead to another and the times started a task force of online. they put out the first website in january '96, i became the first editor of the website. so i changed completely from the traditional journalist to a website journalist, it was quite an education for me. >> do you want know keep going and going? tell me. let me tell you a little bit about the conclusion. i shouldn't tell you too much. i want do you buy the book. [laughter] this is what happened. to have a book like this, you expect that you're going have a know where it comes out. the reporters at the time told me we were going come o
be minimized. this senate commerce, science and transportation subcommittee hearing is an hour 15 minutes. >> [inaudible] >> good morning. we are delighted to have this meeting in the new congress of our science and space subcommittee. nasa and the space programs have been in the news a lot in the past year. some really impressive feats, and we're going to be talking about some of those from rover on mars to the birthing of the spacex capsule at the international space station. i am delighted to have my colleague, senator chris in texas, as our ranking member. -- senator chris. it seems like texas and florida have some interest in the space program. and i'm looking forward to his leadership and i would ask for his opening statement. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. let me echo those sentiments and say how much i'm looking forward to working with you on this subcommittee. spaceflight and our capacity to maintain world leading advantage in spaceflight is a critical priority for the nation. and certainly a critical priority both for the state of texas and the state of florida, and so i am e
tv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very well documented problems which we have failed as a profession to fix. and so i think we need the help more than anything else of the public. it's sort of a -- mass they are people like nerds and lawyers and d
about some of the important historical, literary and cultural science in the area. next we bring the story of the set in in 1939 >> 19395 african-americans were arrested at the alexandria city library as they tried to obtain a library card. the attorney general samuel tucker was beyond the set in which resulted in the creation of a separate library for its black residents. we traveled to the site of the original sin-in and for a place where the black library was built to meet today and african-american history uneasy come to tell the story of samuel tucker and the people that are arrested the day for the act to get a library card. estimate august 31st 5 african-american young men who were not allowed to use the library came in and each politely asked for a library card. they were denied, set down at separate tables and the staff just didn't know what to do with fat to get paid taxes, fall also walls but they are not able to take part in the things of the alexandria citizen was about to take part in. this is part of a program that the young local attorney had been working on for s
capita, per student with the rank and 25 otas 37 default nation's, 17 in science and 14 and reading? >> when i share those statistics with people they cringe a little bit. we are 25th in math and some of the countries ahead of us are hon mariana slovenia. i think as americans we don't expect to be behind slovenia or hungary. when i started years ago someone showed me a scatter plot of all of the developed nations in the world and on the one access it was academic achievement levels of the students and on the other access was the amount of money that country spends per child on their public education system. we were in the cauldrons that you do not want to be which is spending a lot of money and have poor results and the only other thing that was in the squadron plus luxembourg. i think the problem with this notion is that for decades, people have been pushing this idea that what we need in order to fix a system is more money, more money. but when i got to d.c. it wasn't the case they were more than any of our jurisdiction and the entire nation. in new york and new jersey they're spe
a big new university called the king abdullah university of science and technology, which not only makes a saudi men and women, but mixes them with infidel men and women from all over the world. and when one of the 20 senior religious scholars was asked about the appropriateness of this on tv, he said it's wrong. and the king fired him because the king appoints these 20 people, and not surprisingly, many of the other senior men began to discover that the prophet had had his hair washed by women, and other things that made this okay. so people see this, if you will, double standard, and it has undermined it, the credibility of the religious establishment. obviously, with the deeply religious but also with those who don't mind the mixing at all, but just think it's, if they can can get the religious to approve this, why can't they make them approve more things like women driving or whatever. the second pillar of stability in the kingdom is obviously the oil wealth that buys them at least acquiescence, if not loyalty anymore, for the government and royal family. 90% of the treasury in saudi
? >> guest: we did. we're very happy to have won the popular science ces 2013 product of the year. so it's an honor. we've worked very hard to understand consumers and their needs in health care and the financial models and identify how we could fix those problems, so it's nice to have it all come together. >> host: steve cashman, walk us through what happens. let's go on up. >> guest: absolutely. so imagine that you've woke up, you don't feel very well. you've got a fairly good idea what you have. we've all been there, right? it's like how am i going to get into my doctor, get to work, get my prescription picked up. so you've got a couple options. you can go on your iphone, load un, look for the closest healthspot, type in your condition, and we've already got your insurance card and everything stored in the cloud, so all that normal sitting in the waiting room and everything, it is gone. so now that you've found a healthspot and maybe a convenient consumer pharmacy by your home, you're going to walk in and walk up to our healthspot station. as soon as you come in you're going to find,
? >> guest: we are happy to wind the popular science ces 2013 future product of the year so it's an honor and we have worked hard to understand consumers and their needs and health care and the financial models that identify how we can fix those problems so it's nice to have all come it all come together. >> host: steve cashman walk us through what happens. let's go over here. >> guest: so imagine you have woken up and you don't feel very well. you have a fairly good idea of what you have. we have all been there right? been there right? gouda legatum how do i get to my doctor and get my prescription picked that? with us you have a couple of options. you can go on your iphone look for the closest health spot, type in what your conditions are and we are to have your insurance card stored in the clouds all cloud so all that normal sitting in the waiting room is gone. now that you have found a a health spot and it has been and consumer pharmacy buy your home you will walk up to our healthspot station. you will go right in there and find hey i'm a returning patient. i can come up to this and g
but that is what tenure gets us or faculty to do a full inquiry to grow the knowledge and science because students could participate in the research projects so if i want my money's worth i am in favor of that. >> host: would you teach? >> i teach criminal law also at the school of public affairs that they teach law society. >> host: was part due to right this? >> i've been teaching over 20 years and i was beginning to see the same problems over and over like not knowing how to cite material getting themselves in trouble in denver in may but see a great new world that is college to take advantage of the classroom and i raggedy male students i began to use see i was sending the same e-mail's out year after year and it is time to write the book now i can say by the book. >> host: what is the best thing parents can do? >> one is academic side one is reading and writing it is as true today as in the olden days but the other thing parents can do is to get students ready to live lives on their own be here so much about helicopter parents they need to get their students ready this is as simple as had to
degrees in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. in the u.s., 76% of all registered -- from the top, from the top 10% producing. they come from foreign students. foreign students here in the u.s. who then become inventors. these foreign-born inventors are driving economic prosperity with the consequences of their background in these hard sciences. in our current system, we welcome foreign students to the united states. we provide them the world's best education, and then we send them home so that they can compete against us. and, frankly, this makes no sense. america's current involvement in asia must not be confined by the same old approaches that may have once served a purpose, but for now woefully outdated. indeed, we must harness the full potential of american ingenuity to address the spectrum of challenges we have before us. and this is out build samsung in the aftermath of the korean war. and much like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, south korea and samsung are today truly world class. together, we can ensure that the future legacy of ame
a conference, the annual conference of the american political science association, which even now -- certainly then is very austere and trickish and boring event, and we try to. it up a little bit. we had a lot of good ideas. none of which i will mention until the cameras are shut off. [laughter] and i want to say, it was adjust lot of fun to work with ben. when i told them when the ideas were it, it will improve your -- [inaudible] [laughter] so ben has a point of view about how to save the world because the world is in a kind of planet, as we know it, and our country as we know it, is in big trouble. and those troubles include the ecological crisis that we hear about all the time and go about our daily life just as we did before, as if there will be a tomorrow and a tomorrow and tomorrow but there might not be. those troubles include widening spiraling inequality. they include the erosion of the infrastructure of democratic governance but the structure of living together that means the infrastructure of transportation and utilities, the networks that we depend upon as well as the governing s
in political science from the university of massachusetts. the doctor's degree is from dartmouth college. doctor, you are invited to take the podium. [applause] >> thank you. i first want to thank the senator for making progress and including me in this important work that they are doing and making that link between looking at lgbt health and hiv and a portal to act. we started off with president obama giving a historic speech speech in 2011 at ending the aids epidemic at some point in our lifetime. this was quite a moment. the moment of opportunity and optimism that i want to start with. the reason the president obama made that statement is because we have a combination that together is something that could turn the tide on epidemics. we also have a national strategy that the white house about a couple of years ago and provides a roadmap. more than a million people are living with hiv in the united states. for the last decade, they have been at the same level and perhaps more alarmingly, you and infections are rising by those who represent 66% of their infections in the united states.
be pleased to hear me repeat those words today. in fact a few years ago the national institute of science issued a report that included that for every dollar spent on various mitigation measures we can save $4 recovery costs. through mitigation we can get better results and save money and save lives. we must ensure that sound effective litigation policies are thoroughly incorporated into the recovery effort. this is especially important in the change drives the sea levels to rise and increases increase the severity and frequency of coastal storms. by working together we can become stronger by protecting ourselves and future storms. in doing so we can ignore can ignore what i believe and many experts believe may be the under lying cause of storms that hurricane sandy. finding a way to address climate change is not the topic of the year and today but to put in place for connections to reduce the impact. wade we make a mistake we didn't think about why we need to do to dress not just the symptoms of climate change but the core problem itself. i look forward to working with all of you and the
a colleague here in congress brush off the warnings of science about climate change, saying, "god's still up there," implying that there's no need to worry about climate change. well, if god is still up there, what better use of the gifts of moral reasoning that we have been given as his people than to protect his creation and one another from harm? madam president, as we sing in the old hymn, "field and forest, veil and mountain, flowering meadow, flashing sea, chanting bird and flowing fountain call us to rejoice in thee." we are each called in our own way to wake up and to do the right thing. i yield the floor. mr. nelson: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from florida. mr. nelson: madam president, i just want to comment on the senator from rhode island's comments. first of all, i know it's so heartfelt and so genuine, and i want to thank him for that. and i want to thank him from approaching it from a faith-based standpoint about this fragile ecosystem that we live on called planet earth. and he's brought a perspective with that chart that he had of the earth that it is
the government institution itself. a private company was hired by the name of science application international corporation to plan the ministries in iraq. and institute of north carolina which had to teach iraqis about democracy. like to take this opportunity to read a little bit from each of the chapters and then take questions from you about the broader picture. the book as books tend to be coming into, take a little time to get published so the last thing that about in this book was written in july of last ye year. the last time as kabbalah or as complex as like to be able to take the opportunity to explain how things have involved and how much more we know about especially the fraud and waste of taxpayer that is occurred in iraq. so the first chapter is called operational sweatshop iraq and it's about the company halliburton and the amount of money they made in iraq. today we know they have made $10 million in contracts called the provision of every kind of service. the reason the chapters called operation sweatshop iran is of the very nature of the way they do business. typically as much
human rights problem but then i read the science and realized that only of big human-rights problem but there was a foundation in ireland of climate justice that stars with injustice those that are these responsible. it is beginning to affect there is said disconnect but the other would be quite hard that is in to your generational justice. for a short period of time to take measures to curtail the carbon emissions and adapt with slow car been energy because already we have warned the world to a stage of climate shocks that we were headed for the 4 degrees world than it describes that it is catastrophic. the worst in porous parts affects everybody like the titanic. not just the people in steerage who survives. and that it is confusing people that we have forgotten about the people. but let me finish. i don't want to speak for too long. hopefully we have a question and answer but how i captured intergenerational justice. our first grandchild was born he is the older child of the daughter who helped me right. when the number one was born i had a physical reaction. somehow i read calib
, however, the public generally views these space activities as little more than interesting science projects if they know about them at all. yet without them americans' lives would fundamentally change. let me explain with a few brief examples. gps is with the internet one of only two global utilities. it facilitates, for example, having emergency response vehicles reach their destinations by the shortest routes, potentially saving lives, for transoceanic air travel to be safer and more efficient because planes can fly closer together. and if the new satellite-reliant air traffic control system is implemented, reduce jet fuel consumption by one million barrels annually saving both money and the environment, and it saves the trucking industry an estimated $53 billion annually in fuel costs and better fleet management. in addition to the economic benefits of space which are vital to the national interest, there are also direct security implications. politically the recent meteor right that hit the russian yules with the force of an atomic bomb was a stark wake-up call regarding threat
nutrition assistance because of sequester. national science grants cut, is,000 of them. 902 million cut from loans to our small businesses who are the job creators. and even 1 240*u f.b.i,000 f.b.d other law enforcement personnel. so, yes, i say to my friend who is not here -- who is leading the filibuster, the senator from kansas -- i hope he comes and shows up -- i hear him. i feel the pain he feels. i feel the pain he feels for a his state. i have a list that i won't bore you with that shows the cuts to my state. it is painful. but how do you solve it? not by amendment after amendment after amendment on a must-pass bill that the house has said, keep it simple or the government shuts down. not that way. but by turning to the democratic budget. where senator murray and the colleagues there have restored those cuts and they won't other ways to cut, better ways to cut, sensible ways to cut. so i call on my friends on the other side of the aisle, if you want to waste 10 hours, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 hours, it is your call. we will be here. but we are not going to put off the passage of the
're on the brink of incredible breakthroughs in neurological science that could help either find the cure for alzheimer's or do the cognitive stretchout. we've got to spend money to save money. let's put the money into research, let's deal with alzheimer's, parkinson's, lou gehrig's disease, the things that break the family budget, break the family's heart, and also contribute to our public debt. but we can get there if we make wise and prudent choices. most of the people in nursing homes are really primarily women over the age of 80. and what are we going to do? are we going to abandon them? so, mada mr. president, this but is unkind to women. but its also unkind -- and children -- in terms of the opportunity structure. the ryan budget caps and freezes pell grants at $5,645. it requires frame families thate less than $25,000 to qualify for a pell grant. that means that if you're -- many people who seek pell grants are single mothers, and there's recent data out that shows so many of our families now -- 63% -- are in single-parent house holes and it can be a single mother or single dad bu
at a time when we need to be encouraging our children to pursue careers in science and education and research, for biomedical research, we clearly send a message that this may not be the career you want to pursue and, at the same time, as other countries increase their support for biomedical research, we send a message that maybe even though you decide you want to pursue this career, maybe you should pursue it someplace else. this is a serious problem that desperately needs our attention. and so i'm going to ask my colleagues to support an amendment that establishes a clear understanding of the value of biomedical research, of both, again, that opportunity to increase the longevity of our lives, to improve the quality of our lives, to combat those diseases that are so devastating to so many families in our country, knowing that when we do that, not only are we improving individual lives, the well-being of families across our nation, but we are also investing in an opportunity to reduce the long-term cost of health care in the united states. now, madam president, this issue is one
graders. the program's goal is to motivate these students to explore science, technology, engineering and math as they continue their education. military volunteers apply abstract principles to real-world situations by leading tours and giving lectures on the use of stem in different settings and careers. i'm sure that's a nice thing to happen. i'm sure that star base is -- it's nice that fifth graders are able to hear from members of the military. meanwhile, we can't deploy an aircraft carrier. with a war going on, a budget crisis at our doorstep, this is how we elect to spend our taxpayers' defense money. another example is $11.3 million in increase for the civil air program or c.a.p. c.a.p. is a volunteer organization that provides aerospace education to young people, runs a junior cadet program and assists when possible to providing emergency services. its members are hard working, we are grateful for their volunteerism. this year as in the past, the senate armed services committee authorized the president's request for c.a.p. funding. however, c.a.p. is an auxiliary and this shou
is not rocket science in terms of identifying what the issues are. there are two issues here, mr. president. one of them is taxes, and the other is medicare. and the two of them, in fact, are inextricably linked in many respects because i've heard some on the other side of the aisle say i'll look at ways to reform taxes if colleagues on the democratic side will look at ways to protect medicare and at the same time hold down its cost. and we've heard other senators say the reverse. and so these issues are really inextricably linked. and one of the reasons that i support this budget this evening, mr. president, is that i think this budget provides significant space, significant space for democrats and republicans as this process goes forward to produce bipartisan solutions on those two issues, the tax question and the medicare issue in the days ahead. and let me take just a few minutes. senator coats talked about our bipartisan efforts. i've had a chance really for the last five years to work with two very thoughtful conservative republicans, senator coats and our former colleague, senator gregg,
affairs, and a masters degree in political science from the university of massachusetts. or bachelors degree is from dartmouth college. dr. kates, you -- your educated self, please take the podium. [applause] >> thank you. good morning, everyone. we have been at kaiser family foundation analyzing and tracking the affordable care act for many different perspectives and hiv has been a core part of what we do. so to begin i just want to start off with this, because this was president obama on world aids day in 2011 getting a pretty historic speech about the possibility of ending the aids epidemic at some point in our lifetime. and for those of us have been working in hiv for very long time this was quite a moment and it's a moment of opportunity and optimism that i want to start with. the reason president obama made that statement and those of us working in the field are hopeful is that we have a combination now of new scientific advances with existing interventions that together is scaled up could begin to turn the tide on the epidemic. we also have a national hiv strategy for the first
with all the breakthroughs of new science and technology. and it is virtually impossible to get people in washington, d.c. to actually learn how to think about a new world. and i commend all of you -- [applause] -- to go to gingrich productions.com. you'll see a newsletter entitled highness of the future versus prisoners of the past. it captures exactly where we are. we stand today on the edge of a great future, but washington is in both parties. now, i want to ask in part to help us find the pioneers of the future. when you see new ideas, new approaches, new developments, let us know at gingrich production. will try to develop a new university. courses can we love you to either take a course or offer a course or create a workshop. that starts with what reince priebus is doing it is deeper and longer and broader and includes public policy as well as techniques and technology. but we need your help. this is literally a 50 year struggle. october 2719 safety for ronald reagan, national television, you and i are told increasingly we have to choose between a left and a right. well, i would
entering their way across the ocean, looking for people, they've got it down to such a science, basically using isr electronic intercepts, highly technical means. they can tell u.s. navy ship in week until a u.s. navy ship to the research location on the ocean, look up the starboard bow and see that guy going for a nonstop a scout got four and a half tons. uneconomic so is give the name of the driver. the technology pieces huge. it resulted in 150, 200 tons we know of cocaine taken off the market. >> could i just say the flow of cocaine is not appreciably decreased. is that correct? >> there is plenty of cocaine, so we could allow. a shot at again to columbia again to get a lot on their behalf. honduras, guatemala, el salvador. but you do is up work, but there's enough getting through. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator blumenthal. >> thank you, mr. chairman. just to follow that question, general kelley. what more can and should the united states do in your command and potentially others? >> if you're speaking about drugs, just more assets. as i say, were very, very good at locating.
of it for strategic investments in education and science, r&d, you know, moving the economy. and a third to prefund the liability for social security for the next 75 years. imagine if we had done that. instead, what happened was the surplus was put into a huge supply-side tax cut benefiting, as we know now, the wealthiest in the country, adding to a situation where the wealthy have gotten wealthiest and wealthiest in the last decade and the middle class has shrunk and shrunk and there are more and more people just struggling today. so it's all put into a large tax cut. and then we proceeded to go into two wars that weren't paid for, medicare prescription drug plan not paid for, and nothing else paid for, for a decade, and we ended up with the largest deficit in the history of this country. and that's what this president walked into and that's what we have been faced with. now, when we look at where the debt has come from and why it's important that we focus on the economy, we know that the biggest piece of where the debt came from was the tax cuts geared to wealthiest americans, what has been famou
. the national science foundation funds lots of great scientific endeavors in this country. as a matter of fact, they have about four times as many applications for grants as they have money to give out. but they spend a considerable amount of money doing such things as funding -- quote -- "research in political science." in 2008 they spent $10.8 million. $10.9 in 2009, $10.8 million in 2011 and $10.1 million in 2012. what this amendment does is prohibits the national science foundation from wasting federal resources on political science projects and redirects that to other areas with n.s.f. that's going to give the american people a much greater return on their investment. let me give you some examples of what they're funding. campaigns and elections, citizen support in emerging and established democracies, bargaining processes, electoral choice, democratizeization, political change and regime transitions. all important things if we weren't in a budget crisis and a spending crisis. but tell me whether or not you'd rather have the next new computer chip generation developed through a grant at t
, we have one somewhere else i can't remember. $2.6 billion. science, technology, education and math. we all agree it's important. the pentagon has over 100 programs. the pentagon itself has over 100 programs. and then we have another 105 or so programs spread across the rest of the agencies. 13 different agencies have a science, technology and engineering. why is that in the department of education? as i finish this, i won't go to the next chart just on the basis of time. i just outlined a whole bunch of different programs, not one of them has a metric on it that says we're successful or unsuccessful. not one of them. each of these agencies have multiple programs run across multiple organizations. what we have discovered on job training is that we're real good in job training with federal programs of employing people in job training. we're terrible in terms of giving them a life skill that will give them a lifetime work capability. let me take a short time to show you some examples. you can see why we have such big charts. here are the federal preschool and daycare programs. so if y
-effective and we all agree that they should be cost-effective. it should be base upon best available science and benefit low-income and middle-class families. i think we could all agree, i would hope, on the amendment that i would offer and i would hope we would do that and allow the environmental protection agency to carry out its critical mission on behalf of the people of this country. mr. inhofe: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: madam president, i'd like to ask one question of the author and then make a comment. first of all, this does not authorize the e.p.a. to regulate in any way. this sets the standards; is that correct? mr. cardin: the senator is correct. mr. inhofe: okay. madam president, i support this amendment. i suggest that we voice vote it. the presiding officer: if there's no further debate, all those in favor say aye. all those opposed, nay. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. mrs. murray: move to reconsider. mr. leahy: move to table. the presiding officer: without objection. there are now t
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31